Training


New Investigator Pilot Awards


LOI Due December 9

The IDCRC New Investigator Pilot Awards will fund two $50,000 awards per year for research projects and career development activities that will enhance early stage investigators' ability to compete successfully for an independent R- or K-series award. Research projects can address a variety of topics, including vaccinology, therapeutics, laboratory studies, and statistics. We encourage but do not require projects that are value added to existing VTEU projects.

 

RFA Details
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IDCRC Mentorship Program

The IDCRC Mentorship Program is designed to offer mentoring and development of junior investigators and fellows in clinical and translational infectious diseases research. The IDCRC Mentorship Program is structured as a two-year program which includes mentoring advisory meetings, lectures and seminars, and other opportunities tailored to the mentee’s career goals.

Felicia Scaggs Huang, MD, MSc
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Associate Director of Infection Prevention & Control, Cincinnati Children’s

Felicia Scaggs Huang, MD, MSc

Dr. Huang’s primary research interest is finding innovative methods to identify risk factors for and prevent transmission of nosocomial infection in critically ill children. Her current work includes identification of surgical site infection (SSI) risk in penicillin-allergic pediatric patients and modeling the efficacy of chlorhexidine gluconate in SSI prevention to optimize pre-operative bathing regimens.

 Zheyi Teoh, MD
Pediatric Infectious Diseases Fellow, Cincinnati Children’s

Zheyi Teoh, MD

As a new ID fellow, Dr. Teoh has broad interests that he hopes to develop but is specifically interested in epidemiology and public health research.

Maryrose Robles Laguio-Vila, MD
Infectious Diseases Physician; Medical Director of Antimicrobial Stewardship Program, Rochester General Hospital; Associate Program Director, Rochester General Hospital Internal Medicine Residency Program

Maryrose Robles Laguio-Vila, MD

Dr. Laguio-Vila's research focuses on the sociobehavioral influences of antibiotic prescribing, meaningful measures of antibiotic use, optimizing clinical decision making electronic medical record tools to enhance stewardship, diagnostic stewardship, and integration of antimicrobial stewardship into resident medical education.

 Jennifer Whitaker, MD, MS
Assistant Professor of Molecular Virology and Microbiology and Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Baylor College of Medicine

Jennifer Whitaker, MD, MS

Dr. Whitaker's research focuses on vaccine development through clinical trials. She is interested in assessing vaccine strategies that will lead to improved immunogenicity and efficacy in immunocompromised persons.

 Christine Akamine, MD
Infectious Diseases Fellow, Baylor College of Medicine

Christine Akamine, MD

Dr. Akamine's research focus is vaccinology and COVID-19 - specifically the clinical and virologic characteristics of patients with prolonged SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid detection.

 Meagan Deming, MD, PhD
Infectious Diseases Fellow, University of Maryland Medical Center

Meagan Deming, MD, PhD

Dr. Deming is a virologist with experience including antibody neutralization and vaccine characterization in mouse models of severe coronavirus infections. She is also an adult infectious disease fellow, currently working on respiratory virus vaccines (coronaviruses and influenza) and improving vaccine responses for immunocompromised hosts.

Monica McArthur, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine

Monica McArthur, MD, PhD

Dr. McArthur is a pediatric infectious disease specialist and physician scientist with interest in vaccine development and human immunology. Additionally, she studies translational human immunology to identify correlates of protection with the goal of facilitating vaccine development.

 Helen Stankiewicz Karita, MD
Acting Instructor, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington

Helen Stankiewicz Karita, MD

Dr. Karita's research is concentrated on the epidemiology and prevention of HPV-associated cancers. With the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, her research interest evolved to identifying therapeutics for prevention and early treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

 Tara Brinck Reid, MD, PhD
Infectious Diseases Fellow, University of Washington

Tara Brinck Reid, MD, PhD

Dr. Reid's previous work focused on antigenic variation in T. pallidum and the natural history of syphilis infection. Her focus now is on improving our understanding of T cell response to syphilis infection and using this knowledge to inform vaccine design.

Jared Frisby, DO
Infectious Diseases Fellow, Saint Louis University

Jared Frisby, DO

Dr. Frisby's research focuses on improving inpatient and outpatient vaccine utilization, improving medical education and antimicrobial stewardship.

Training

T32 Training Programs in Vaccine Sciences

Two academic centers within the LOC, Emory University and University of Maryland have the nation’s only T32 Training Programs in Vaccine Sciences.

University of Maryland Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) T32 Training Program in Vaccinology

The program, in existence for 20 years, includes 32 training faculty who span all phases of vaccinology. The program includes a core curriculum designed to convey the interdisciplinary nature of the field and provides context for the specific area of research. Dr. Kathleen Neuzil, Co-Chair of the IDCRC, is the Co-Director of the University of Maryland program.

Emory Vaccine T32 Training Program in Vaccinology

The program, established in 2010 supports young researchers across several disciplines to integrate basic, translational, clinical, analytic, social and applied sciences in Vaccinology. There are 40 preceptors from 12 departments/programs in the program. It introduces PhD, MD, and MD/PhD scientists with diverse backgrounds to a comprehensive advanced training program. Dr. Walter Orenstein, a member of the IDCRCLG, is the founding and current PI for the Emory Vaccinology Training Grant.

Other Related T32 Training Grants

The UAB Division of Infectious Diseases T32 Training Grant has longstanding strength in mentoring in all aspects of the study of STI, especially chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and genital herpes. The goal of University of Washington’s STD/AIDS T32 Research Training Grant is to train the next generation of leaders in STI and AIDS research; SDSU Director, Dr. Elizabeth Brown, is a mentor on this grant. In addition, the existing clinical and translational training programs at each of the eight academic medical centers within the LOC consortium provide model programs, experienced mentors and have institutional K, T and Masters’ programs in Clinical Research and Public Health.

These existing programs include:

  • Emory University Clinical and Translational Research: Supported by the Georgia CTSA: Clinical Research Bootcamp designed to provide junior investigators with a comprehensive overview of key clinical research concepts
  • Biostatistics for clinical and translational researchers, a weeklong biostatistics course that covers statistical concepts and analytical methods for data encountered in the biomedical sciences, biotechnology, and clinical/translational research
  • Grant Writing Bootcamp, a series of scientific and grant writing sessions for early career investigators
  • Team Science Training, a colloquium that addresses how to conduct team science
  • Mentor training for trainees, a workshop devoted to optimizing the mentor-mentee relationship adapted from the NIH National Research Mentoring Network.

Research Training at NIAID